In his post Instructional Design Lessons from the State Fair, Brian Washburn discusses learner preference from the viewpoint of his children’s behaviors at the state fair. One child enjoys going on the rides while the other would rather play the games. Washburn relates learning to going on a roller coaster. He explains that a ride is something that happens to you. There is no need to perform or do anything, just enjoy the ride. He claims that some people prefer to learn in the same fashion as riding a ride. They prefer to sit back and let it happen, becoming passengers to the material they are learning. Washburn asks “What can we, as instructional designers and trainers, do to hold ourselves accountable to making sure this kind of training participant still walks away with increased knowledge, skills or abilities?” He proposes multiple methods of delivery, such as storytelling and gaming,…

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Hybrid Learning has been thrust into the spotlight within my network of corporate trainers. It seems to be the most appropriate solution to the “new normal.” Leaners still get the lessons they need and then they can come into an in-person workshop when it is safe to do so. It made perfect sense to me, so I began to think of ways to convert existing in-person workshops to media that is in line with hybrid learning. My plan was to convert some stuff to PowerPoint, put together a few eLearning modules and roll everything out piece by piece.  Of course, everyone else was doing it so why shouldn’t we? Enter, Stephanie Morgan from hrzone.com. In researching strategies, I came across her post titled Blended learning: how to craft the perfect blend for boosting performance. In it, she discusses a post from Donald Clark about what blended learning shouldn’t be. Suffice…

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  The Covid-19 pandemic is making some trainers rethink their usual methods of delivering learning. For some, switching over to remote or hybrid learning wasn’t an issue. For others, including me, the option for remote is just not there. For those of us that may be stuck with classroom style training as the only medium allowed for training, we are tasked with coming up for strategies to train in a socially distant world.             First worry and consideration is class size. It depends on the size of your facilities. For me, we are reduced to half the amount of people allowed in our training rooms. Many of our workshops utilize group work and role plays, all of which may not be the safest activities to perform. Also, the thought of wearing a face covering for multiple hours a day is a cause for concern and could be a major distraction. …

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